Psychological Assessment & Expert Witness Assessment

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ASD Assessment

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)


People with autism exhibit the severity of autistic symptoms on a spectrum. The lowest level of the autism spectrum is Level 1 (high functioning autism sometimes called Asperger Syndrome). At the opposite end of the spectrum are individuals at Level 3, these individuals require substantial support.



Autism-Specturm-Disorder
Figure 1: Autism Spectrum



Autism Symptoms


ASD Assessment



The symptoms of autism displayed may vary according to age, intelligence and whether the individual can speak or not. The key characteristics in the ASD assessment process are summarised below using the framework developed in the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (Second Edition). This framework is closely aligned to the diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (Fifth Edition) (DSM-5).

Please note that autism can often cooccur with other conditions such as ADHD, dyspraxia, dyslexia, learning disabilities and anxiety.

A. Autistic Language and Communication


Speech Abnormalities


Some people with ASD have speech that has little variation in pitch and tone, rather flat or exaggerated intonation. Sometimes it can be speech that is somewhat unusual or slow or jerky. At the opposite end of the spectrum are individuals with phase speech which is inadequate in complexity or frequency. Some individuals with autism do not speak at all.

Repetition



My individuals with ASD show immediate repetition of the last statement or series of statements given by others.

Stereotyped/Idiosyncratic Use of Words or Phrases


People with ASD range from those who use words or phrases which tend to be more repetitive than most. At the other end of the spectrum are individuals who occasionally use stereotyped words.

Conversation



Individuals with ASD range from those who speech include some spontaneous elaboration of responses to those with little spontaneous communicative speech.

Pointing



Some people with autism use pointing to reference objects and express interest, they do so without coordinated gaze or vocalisation.

Descriptive Gestures


Many individuals with autism use some descriptive gestures to represent an event such as brushing one’s teeth or combing one’s hair. Others use very limited conventional or descriptive gestures.

Offers Information



An individual with ASD may spontaneously offer information at one end of the spectrum. At the other end of the ASD spectrum, an individual may rarely offer information except about their circumscribed interests.

Asks for Information


At one end of the ASD spectrum, individuals may occasionally ask for information. At the other end, the individual will rarely or never ask others about feelings or experiences.

Reports Events


Some people with autism can report specific nonroutine events. At the opposite end of the spectrum, some individuals provide inconsistent or insufficient responses to even specific probes.

Conversation


Individuals vary from those who can engage in dialogue to those who have little spontaneous communicative speech.

Descriptive Gestures


At one extreme some individuals make spontaneous use of several descriptive gestures. At the other end, there is very limited spontaneous use of conventional, instrumental, informal or descriptive gestures.

Emphatic or Emotional Gestures


There is a spectrum of abilities with some people able to show a variety of appropriate and emphatic and emotional gestures that are integrated to speech. At the other end of the spectrum, there are those that show no or a very limited emphatic or emotional gestures.


AUTISM SPECTURM DISORDER





B. Reciprocal Social Interaction


Some Individuals Display Poor Eye Contact



Some individuals with ASD display poor eye contact to modulate or terminate social interactions.

Ability to Direct Facial Expressions Appropriately



Some individuals with autism do not direct their facial expressions to other people when communicating appropriately.

Ability to Show Pleasure and Shared Enjoyment and Interaction



Some individuals with ASD can show pleasure during more than one activity. Some people with autism may have little or no expressed pleasure in interactions.

Ability to Communicate Own Effect



Although some autistic individuals can communicate a range of emotions, others have hardly any or no communication of what they are feeling or have felt.

Ability to Link Speech to Non-Verbal Communication


At one end of the spectrum, individuals moderate their non-verbal gestures in line with their speech. At the other end of the spectrum there is some avoidance of eye contact, or in extreme cases, individuals are unable to speak or make minimal or no use of gesture and facial expression.

Ability to Communicate Feelings and Emotions Using Words


While some individuals are able to communicate many emotions, the feelings they have felt ―others exhibit hardly any ability to communicate the feelings and emotions verbally and nonverbally.

Ability to Understand of The Emotions of Others and Show Empathy to Others


Although many individuals with autism can understand and label or respond to the emotions of others; some individuals have no or minimal ability to identify, communicate and understand the emotions of others.

Ability to Show Insight into Social Situations and Relationships


Some individuals with autism show no or limited insight into typical social relationships. At the other end of the autistic spectrum, some individuals show insight into the nature of many typical social relationships.

Ability to Show Responsibility for His or Her Own Actions


At one end of the autistic spectrum are individuals who are responsible for many of their own actions across a variety of contacts which include daily living, work school and money et cetera. At the other end of the ASD spectrum are individuals who have a restricted sense of responsibility for their actions as would the appropriate to their level of development and age.

Quality of Attempts to Initiate Social Interaction


At one end of the ASD spectrum are individuals who use verbal and non-verbal methods to communicate social overtures appropriately. At the other end of the ASD spectrum are individuals who cannot engage in social overtures of any kind.

Frequency of Attempts to Get an Maintain Attention of Others


Although some individuals make frequent attempts to maintain the attention of others and direct their attention, others show an unusually frequent or excessive demand for attention.

Quality of Social Responses



While some individuals display a diversity of appropriate responses that change according to the immediate situation. However, others have minimal or inappropriate responses to the social context.

Frequency of Reciprocal Social Communication


Autistic individuals vary from those who make extensive use of verbal or non-verbal behaviours for social interchange to those that engage in little or no communication.


C. Imagination



Imagination/Creativity


Some individuals with autism show no creative or inventive actions. At the other end of the ASD spectrum are individuals who display numerous creative, spontaneous responses in activities and communication.


D. Stereotyped Behaviours and Restricted Interests


Unusual Sensory Interest in Play Material


Some individuals with ASD exhibit a pronounced unusual sensory interest while others show no unusual sensory interests or sensory seeking behaviours.

Hand to Finger and Other Complex Mechanisms


Some individuals with ASD display no hand to finger or other complex mechanisms such as repetitive clapping. At the other end of the spectrum, there are individuals who frequently exhibit such behaviours.

Self-injury



Some individuals with ASD engage in aggressive acts to harm themselves, these acts include headbanging, pulling out their own hair, biting themselves or slapping their own faces. Other individuals with ASD do not engage in this type of behaviour.

Disproportionate Interest or Reference to Specific Topics or Repetitive Behaviours [h3]

Some individuals with ASD display a marked preoccupation with interests or behaviours which interfere with their day-to-day activities. For example, a type of car. Other individuals with ASD display no excessive interests.

Rituals and Compulsions



Some individuals show obvious activities or verbal routines which must be discharged in full or in line with a sequence which is not part of a task. However, others may have one or several activities or routines which they have to complete in a specific way. They will become anxious if this activity is disrupted.

Other Abnormal Behaviours



Although some individuals can sit still appropriately, other individuals with ASD may have difficulty sitting still and may be overactive. Some individuals with autism, however, may be underactive.

Autism Meltdowns, Aggression and Disruption



Many people with autism display no destructive or aggressive behaviour. However, some people with ASD may talk loudly, they may have significant temper tantrums. Such tantrums frequently occur when there is a change of routine or change of environment.

Anxiety


Whilst many individuals with ASD show no marked signs of anxiety, others show significant anxiety in their day-to-day interaction.


ASD CHECKLIST - HOW MUCH DO YOU REALLY KNOW ABOUT AUTISM?




Find Out More About Autism




Autism and The Law


People with ASD in the criminal justice system are affected as victims, witnesses and defendants. It is important that defendants with ASD are not unnecessarily criminalised because of their condition. The Youth Justice Centre (2018) recommend that it is important that both victims and defendants are supported to give best evidence at the police station and at court.

Because many people with autism are often quite vulnerable, there is a need for prosecutors to draw this to the attention of judges when sentencing perpetrators of crimes against victims with ASD.

Autism and Criminal Defence


Some individuals with autism may find it difficult to answer even the most straightforward questions asked by the police. Additionally, some young children with autism who self-harm may unwittingly be assumed to be victims of child abuse.

A person with autism might:
  • Be overwhelmed by police presence;
  • Fear a person in uniform;
  • React with fight or flight;
  • Not respond to “stop” or other commands; and
  • Not respond with his or her name or other verbal commands
  • May avoid eye contact.

Mogavero (2016) found that too many individuals with ASD are enter the criminal justice system due to inappropriate sexual behaviour.

Judges have discretion when sentencing, and it is important to point out that a custodial sentence may have a more devastating effect for an individual with autism than someone without the condition.



AUTISM AND CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY




LEARN MORE ABOUT AUTISM AND THE LAW


Autism and the Criminal Justice System



Autism and Disability Discrimination


Autism and Child Contact



Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA)

Pathological Demand Avoidance in Adults



What is Pathological Demand Avoidance?


People with Pathological Demand Avoidance or PDA are driven to avoid demands due to their high anxiety levels when they feel that they are not in control.

PDA is increasingly recognised as being part of the autism spectrum. Some psychologists refer to it as a diagnostic profile or sub-type within autism. Individuals with PDA share difficulties with others on the autism spectrum in terms of social aspects of interaction and communication, together with some repetitive behaviour patterns. However, people with PDA often seem to have better social understanding than others on the spectrum

In individuals with PDA, their avoidance is clinically-significant in its extent and extreme nature. Children and adults with PDA can also mask their difficulties, and their behaviour can vary between settings.

PDA is a relatively new diagnosis it is frequently confused with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) as a diagnosis. PDA as shown in the diagram below from the PDA Society (www.pdasociety.org.uk) PDA falls within the circle of Autistic Spectrum Disorders, whereas ODD does not. There other conditions with frequently cooccur with autism in the green circle.

Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA)

Figure 1: Pathological Demand Avoidance and its Interplay with Autism


Please note that Asperger Syndrome is now referred to as High Functioning Autism (HFA), although there is still some dispute that they are separate conditions.
There is overlap between most of these diagnoses. The term 'can't help won't' is often used to describe PDA.


PDA Not Yet Recognised in the DSM-5 and ICD-10

Many people are diagnosed with PDA as a condition in its own right. Presumably, this is because they do not meet the full diagnostic criteria for Autism Spectrum disorder ASD. The problem with this approach is that:

▪ PDA is not included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - fifth edition (DSM-5)
▪ PDA is not included in the International Classification of Diseases - 10th Edition (ICD-10)

Consequently, if the condition does not appear in the leading diagnostic manuals for psychological conditions some schools and educational institutions may find it difficult to provide support. Many argue that every individual with PDA is autistic.


PDA as a Form of Autism Spectrum Disorder


It is becoming more common for people to receive a diagnosis of ‘Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) characterised by extreme demand avoidance.’ Alternatives ways of putting the diagnosis are:

  • ASD with a PDA profile;
  • ASD sub-type PDA; or
  • Atypical autism with demand avoidant tendencies.



Learn more about the key Characteristics of Pathological Demand Avoidance


6 Main Characteristics Pathological Demand Avoidance Are:


  1. Resisting and avoiding the ordinary demands of life;
  2. Using social strategies as part of the avoidance;
  3. Appearing sociable on the surface but lacking depth in their understanding;
  4. Excessive mood swings and impulsivity;
  5. Being comfortable in role play and pretence, sometimes to an extreme extent and often in a controlling fashion; and
  6. Obsessive’ behaviour that is often focused on other people, which can make relationships very tricky.
Direct demands tend to increase anxiety levels, which lead to overload in the individual. The deficient behaviour is a strategy for the individual to try to manage the anxiety caused by the demands. Many of these demands may be quite modest to individuals without PDA.


Individuals with PDA have Many Positive Characteristics


One should not lose sight of the fact that individuals with PDA can be quite positive and have many strengths. They can interact well socially and can be quite talkative. They are said to have charm and can be warm and affectionate. Their need to take control means that they are often seen as quite determined. They can have a rich imagination and are frequently described as creative and passionate.


8 Top Tips on Managing Children with PDA





8 Top Tips on How to Support Individuals with Pathological Demand Avoidance


Pathological Demand Avoidance Treatment


1. Flexibility

Always make sure that your day activities are flexible, the the individual with PDA child might not want to do them in a particular order they might want to do it in a completely different order. Allow that flexibility and you will find that the individual with PDA will be able to cope with the anxieties of the day a lot easier.

2. Control.


People with PDA need to feel so they are in control like autism, and other ASDs anxiety rules the day for them if they do not feel in control of a situation the sense of anxiety rises and then they feel panicky and fearsome of what is going to happen; particularly when it comes to change for PDA individual the fear of not being in control generates a resistance to what if the change or a request you might want them to do something they might not be able to do or not want to do it because they might get it wrong.

3. Ease Anxiety.


If changes needed, then talk the PDA individual through it you might want to talk to them you might want to write it down in steps like bullet points or you could use images or pictures either way show the PDA individual that there is a beginning a middle and the end of a request or activity you want them to carry out; this will ease the anxiety for the individual

4. Unravel the Fear


PDA individuals often see the worst in every situation they will always think of the worst thing that could possibly happen; reassure the PDA individual that there is nothing to worry about - do not be confrontational.

5. Building up Self Confidence


A lot of PDA individuals have a problem with self-esteem and confidence they think that if they do whatever it is they are being asked to do they are not going to do it properly; it might be that they feel they will be laughed at. They might feel embarrassed. There is a huge amount of anxiety that is behind these inner fears the best thing to do is boost up PDA individual’s confidence tell them exactly what they get right, tell them what they are good at.

6. Make the change outcome beneficial


Help the person with PDA see that the change out is beneficial to them, and not to you. The key here is to make them feel that they are making the decision themselves, make them think that actually the decision is their decision. Always make the outcome look beneficial to them and not to you.

7. Provide a Responsibility


We know that people with PDA love to be in control of their own world given the responsibility to do something to help themselves this will make them feel as though they are completely in control of their being and their body and, therefore, the outcome. The secret to it is careful wording in the request do not bark an order at them but suggest a way of doing something and add the element of responsibility into that request so they feel as though they are doing something for themselves.

8. Set boundaries


People with PDA need to know there will be a beginning a middle and an end. Help them to think what it will be like to achieve the end result. Provide them with a sense of responsibility.


Learn More About Pathological Avoidance Syndrome



What is Educational Psychologist & Child Psychologist?

Educational Psychologist Assessment


It is a common misconception that only educational psychologists can assess specific learning disabilities such as dyslexia, ADHD, dyspraxia, and autism. However, psychologists from several other disciplines in psychology frequently assess these conditions and the learning needs of children and adults.

Educational-Psychologist

Educational Psychologists and Child Psychologists Assess Dyslexia, Autism, ADHD, Learning Disabilities & Children's Emotional Problems




Child Psychologist Near Me


The term child psychologist, in the UK, means a psychologist who spends at least 30% of their time carrying out assessments and therapy with children and young people.
Child psychologists are primarily concerned with developmental psychology, special educational needs, learning disability, the impacts of child abuse and parenting practices. Child psychologists may work on the same psychological issues as educational psychologists.

Find A Child Psychologist Near Me: London + Birmingham + Nottingham

Other Psychologists who Assess Learning Disabilities and Neurodevelopmental Conditons


Psychologists working in other areas of psychology such as neuropsychology, frequently assess neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism, and ADHD, Developmental Coordination Disorder (dyspraxia), learning disabilities and specific learning disabilities such as dyslexia and dyscalculia.
Occupational psychologists, depending on their experience, may carry out assessments of dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia ADHD, autism and learning disability in an occupational setting. Similarly, some clinical psychologists and forensic psychologists frequently carry out assessments of these conditions.


What is an Educational Psychologist?




What is A Child Psychologist?


How Child Psychologists Help




Child Psychology: How to Discipline a Child the Does not Listen




Learning Disabled and Intellectually Gifted Under 5-year Olds

Learning Disabled and Intellectually Gifted Under 5-Year Olds


We have reviewed two IQ tests the Stanford-Binet and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence that we use to assess intellectually gifted and learning disabled under five-year olds. The problem for psychologists carrying out assessment is that there are limited psychological tests available to assess under five-year olds. Furthermore, children under five develop intellectual ability at very different rates.



The Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale


The benefit of using the Stanford-Binet IQ test is that it can assess individual from the age two up to 85 years plus.

Thus, the
Standford-Binet is more cost effective for psychologists that both in terms of time it takes to learn to administer the test and the cost of materials than the market leading IQ test the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. The Wechsler Scales have three different IQ test for each age group, preschool children, children from five to 16 and adults from 16 upwards, it costs considerably more.


Learn How to Answer the Stanford Binet Intelligence Test


Practice Standford Binet IQ Test Questions
The main limitations of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence test are in the UK is that many of the tests that are used to provide additional information on learning disabled and intellectually gifted and learning disabled under 5 year olds use the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence. Finally, the Stanford-Binet is not yet approved as one of the intelligence tests for the identification dyslexia.


Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and ADHD Disabilites Under the Equality Act 2010

The Interplay Between the Disabilities of Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and ADHD


Dyslexia can co-occur with other neurodevelopmental conditions such as ADHD. Because individuals are born with dyslexia, ADHD other conditions such as autism these conditions often meet the criteria of a disability under the Equality Act 2010.

That is, they are:

  • Significant
  • Substantial; and
  • Have a long-term effect on the individual’s normal day to day activities.


Extra Time In Examinations and Additional Support


The implications for of this in the for school, college and university students is that these students have special educational needs. They should be entitled to extra time to complete examination, additional tuition and other reasonable adjustments to the way that they are taught. For those in university are entitled to a grant from Student Finance England – to purchase the additional equipment and tuition they need.

Expert-Witness-Psychologists-Advanced-Assessments-Ltd


Many Dyslexics Are Highly Intelligent Achievers

A common misconception is that people with dyslexia are less intelligent – this is incorrect there are many highly intelligent individuals and high achievers with dyslexia in all walks of life such including Doctors, lawyers and famous businss people such as Richard Branson. Those with dyslexia, and dyspraxia and have a more diverse way of processing information.

The Psychologist as an Expert Witness

Psychological assessment is becoming more and more complex. The demands on experts are considerable, yet there is an alarming number of professionals who do not understand the role of the expert witness is one of an independent advisor to the court rather than their advocate.

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